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A final Parisian art gallery post – can’t end the series without some works from the Louvre

Sunday, August 6th, 2017

A brief exposé of some of the lesser known works in the Louvre art gallery.

These were all shot with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 II Micro Four Thirds camera with the Olympus mZD 40-150mm f/2.8 pro lens.

A touch of my own styling to some of the beautiful marble sculptures:

Louvre

Pierre Paul Rubens Portrait d’Helene Fourment 1636:

Louvre

Pierre Paul Rubens Clélie passant le Tibre (Cloelia crossing the Tiber) 1635:

Louvre

Antoon van Dyck Les Amours de Renaud et de l’enchanteresse Armide (The loves of Rinaldo and the enchantress Armida) 1641:

Louvre

Jacob Jordaens Le roi boit (The king drinks) 1638-40:

Louvre

My take on the Restoration of Melpomene Muse de la tragedie in marble 1st century AD Rome:

Louvre

Leonardo Da Vinci’s Saint Jean-Baptiste 1513-16 – sometimes reflections are impossible to get rid of, and I didn’t bring a polarising filter to help – my bad:

Louvre

Alessandro Filipepi dit Botticelli Un jeune homme presente par Venus 1483-85:

Louvre

Alessandro Filipepi dit Botticelli Venus et Le Trois Graces offrant des presents a une jeune fille (Venus and The Three Graces) 1483-85:

Louvre

My take on the Winged goddess of Victory of Samothrace 3rd-1st century BC Greece:

Louvre

Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy-Trioson Pygmalion et Galatee 1824:

Louvre

Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy-Trioson Atala au tombeau 1808:

Louvre

Louise David Les Sabines 1799:

Louvre

Louise David Les Amours de Paris et d’Helene 1788:

Louvre

Pierre Peyron La mort d’Alceste 1785:

Louvre

Anselm Kiefer Athanor 2007:

Louvre

Perhaps it is that we can’t appreciate life without seeing death, and perhaps we all too often take for granted the wonderful aspects of culture that history has betrothed upon us even though their permanence is not guaranteed in our violent world. Live in the presence and appreciate what we have, protect our past and look to a future enhanced by us being here – not a future of despair and destruction as has been the case so often in our past.

The beautiful Musee D’Orsay – a must see art gallery in Paris – part III

Saturday, August 5th, 2017

Part III of my little exposé of the wonderful Musee D’Orsay art gallery.

Let’s go onto some more of my favorite artworks – the gallery boasts an incredible range of beautiful nudes which I will limit here to hopefully ensure viewing is not an issue in workplaces although there is a bold male nude as an allegory to war at the end of this post!

These were all shot with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 II Micro Four Thirds camera with the Olympus mZD 40-150mm f/2.8 pro lens.

A touch of my own styling to some of the beautiful marble sculptures:

D'Orsay

Denys Puech Aurore 1900:

D'Orsay

D'Orsay

Georges de Feure Panneau d’Elegante 1901-1903:

D'Orsay

Eduoard Vuillard Le Doctor Georges Viau dans son cabinet dentaire 1914:

D'Orsay

Pierre Bonnard La Loge 1908:

D'Orsay

Pierre Bonnard Le chapelle du chateau de Versailles 1917:

D'Orsay

Aristide Maillol La femme a l’ombrelle 1895:

D'Orsay

Felix Valloton Madame Alexandre Bernheim 1902:

D'Orsay

Felix Valloton Baigneuse Rose 1893:

D'Orsay

Georges Seurat Poseuse de profil 1887:

D'Orsay

Charles Angrand Couple dans la rue 1887:

D'Orsay

Paul Signac Femme a l’ombrelle 1893:

D'Orsay

Paul Signac Femmes au puits 1892:

D'Orsay

Paul Signac Entre du port de la Rochelle 1921:

D'Orsay

The beautiful Musee D’Orsay – a must see art gallery in Paris – part I

Tuesday, July 25th, 2017

The Musee D’Orsay has to be one of my favorite art galleries with its art works primarily from the late 19th century and early 20th century, dominated by beautiful sculptures, and paintings from the Romanticism, Pre-Raphaelite, Symbolist and French Impressionism movements to name a few, and set in the wonderfully transformed train station.

It does have a rather strange lack of toilets though, and the only one I found had a long line of ladies queued up and forced to stand outside the open door of the men’s room with full view of the line of urinals – well when in Paris, you just have to not worry about these things – although I suspect it was more awkward for the ladies who are not used to such experiences!

But let’s go onto some of my favorite artworks – although the gallery boasts an incredible range of beautiful nudes which I will limit here to ensure viewing is not an issue in workplaces.

These were all shot with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 II Micro Four Thirds camera with the Olympus mZD 40-150mm f/2.8 pro lens.

I had to adjust the lights a bit for this one :)

D'Orsay

Amaury-Duval Madame de Loynes 1862:

D'Orsay

Ernest Hébert La Lavandera ou Jeune lavandiére songuese 1869:

D'Orsay

Honoré Daumier Crispin et Scapin 1864:

D'Orsay

Maxwell Armfield Faustine 1904:

D'Orsay

Edward Burne-Jones Princess Sabra 1865:

D'Orsay

Ford Madox Brown a pioneer in the Pre-Raphaelite movement – Haydée découvrant le corps de Don Juan 1878:

D'Orsay

Edgard Maxence La Légende bretonne 1906:

D'Orsay

Ferdinand Hodler Madame Valentine Godé-Darel malade 1914:

D'Orsay

Gustave Moreau Orphée 1865 (Moreau continues the myth of Orpheus, with the vision of a girl dressed in Oriental finery rescuing the poet’s head which rests on his lyre, and the girl is gazing at him with a melancholy air. The diagonal compositions suggests a playing card, in which the musicians in the top left corner are balanced by the turtles, lower right, whose carapace, according to the myth, was used to make the first lyre – Moreau counts as a decisive figure in the Symbolist movement):

D'Orsay

Gustave Moreau Hésiode et la Muse 1891:

D'Orsay

Henri de Toulouse-Laetrec Rousse (La Toilette) 1889:

D'Orsay

Henri de Toulouse-Laetrec Femme de profil Madame Lucy 1896:

D'Orsay

Philipe de Laszlo La comtesse Anna de Noailles 1913:

D'Orsay

Pablo Picasso La Buveuse d’absinthe dit aussi Buveuse accoudée 1901:

D'Orsay

Henri de Toulouse-Laetrec Au Nouveau Cirque, Papa Chrysantheme 1894:

D'Orsay

A. Carrier Belleuse 1873:

D'Orsay

Denys Puech Sirene 1889:

D'Orsay

Gustave Courbet L’Atelier du peintre 1855:

D'Orsay

Jean-Francois Millet Femme nue couchée 1844-1845:

D'Orsay

It is indeed a privilege to be able to view these works in reality, and it is not something to be taken for granted with the world going crazy yet again and destruction of culture rampant.

Monet’s water lilies and the Musee D’Orangerie in Paris – some of my favorite artworks from the gallery

Friday, July 21st, 2017

The Musee D’Orangerie is adjacent to the Louvre and is a wonderful art gallery mainly of late 19th century and early 20th century art works, but in particular, Claude Monet’s water lily series.

These were all shot with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 II Micro Four Thirds camera with Olympus mZD 7-14mm f/2.8 pro lens such as the above and below image, and the Olympus mZD 25mm f/1.2 pro lens.

Here are some of Claude Monet’s famous water lily paintings:

Monet

Monet

Monet

Monet

Monet

Despite their dominance in the gallery, there is far more to see such as these:

Claude Monet’s Argenteuile 1875:

D'Orangerie

Pablo Picasso’s Femme au tambourin 1925:

D'Orangerie

Paul Cezanne’s Arbres et maisons 1885-86:

D'Orangerie

Henri Matisse’s Les trois soeurs 1916-17:

D'Orangerie

Marie Laurencin’s Danseuses espagnoles 1920-21:

D'Orangerie

The unmistakable style of Amedeo Modigliani and in this case, Femme au ruban de velours 1915:

D'Orangerie

Maurice Utrillo (1883-1955), who even in his early life was plagued with mental illness, was essentially raised by his grandmother, and was the son of an 18 yr old artist’s model with speculation that his father may have been Renoir or one of the other artists she had modeled for. He was born in Montmartre and like many artists, lived a very bohemian life style. His mental illness was exacerbated by alcoholism and he spent some time in mental asylums.

I am guessing these ladies walking with a painter made Maurice Utrillo’s world go round after the war ended – La Maison Bernot 1924 – the bell tower of the Sacré Coeur basilica which was completed in 1912 was cropped when I took the photo and is not shown:

D'Orangerie

Gustave Moreau’s La Toilette 1885-90:

D'Orangerie

Pablo Picasso’s Saltimbanque aux bras croises 1923:

D'Orangerie

And, for something completely different – Hans Hartung’s T 1963 K7 1963:

D'Orangerie

Some art works from Berlin’s Alte Nationalgalerie

Sunday, July 16th, 2017

When in Berlin, purchase a 3 day Museum Pass (but don’t forget most museums are closed on Mondays), and allow yourself time for maximum of 3 museums each day – assuming you like art or history!

Berlin’s Alte Nationalgalerie is on the Museum Island and mainly holds 19th century art works, so let’s see a few of my favorites from the gallery.

These were all shot with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 II Micro Four Thirds camera with Olympus mZD 40-150mm f/2.8 pro lens

Antonia Canova’s Hebe 1796; In ancient Greek religion, Hebe is the goddess of youth and daughter of Zeus and Hera, and was the cupbearer for the gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus, serving their nectar and ambrosia, until she was married to Heracles.

Alte Nationalgalerie

Arthur Kampf’s Der Artist 1907:

Alte Nationalgalerie

Osman Hamdi Bey’s Persian Carpet Dealer on the Street 1888

Alte Nationalgalerie

Sabine Lepsius’ Self portrait 1885

Alte Nationalgalerie

Christian Daniel Rauch’s Kranzwerfende Viktoria (Throwing the Wreath of Victory to the Winner) 1838-45 which has served as a model for football league trophies, but which I have rendered as sepia here (it is really lovely white marble):

Alte Nationalgalerie

Franz von Lenbach’s Theodor Mommsen 1897

Alte Nationalgalerie

Edouard Manet’s Im Wimtergarten (In the conservatory) 1879

Alte Nationalgalerie

Max Liebermann’s Kleinkinderschule in Amsterdam (Kindergarten or toddler’s school in Amsterdam) 1880

Alte Nationalgalerie

Heinrich Anton Dahling’s Kranzwinderinnen (Woman braiding wreaths) 1828

Alte Nationalgalerie

Elisabeth Jerichau-Baumann’s Twin Portrait of the Brothers Grimm 1855

Alte Nationalgalerie

Moritz von Schwind’s The Painter Joseph Binder’s Adventure 1860

Alte Nationalgalerie

Georg Friedrich Eberhard Wachter’s Telemachs Ruckkehr (Telemachus’ Return) 1800-08; Telemachus is a figure in Greek mythology, the son of Odysseus and Penelope, and a central character in Homer’s Odyssey. The first four books of the Odyssey focus on Telemachus’s journeys in search of news about his father (Odysseus, who left for Troy when Telemachus was still an infant), who has yet to return home from the Trojan War.

Alte Nationalgalerie

Carl Friedrich Lessing’s Schutzen am Engpass (Riflemen Defending a Pass) 1851

Alte Nationalgalerie

Carl Friedrich Lessing’s Ritterburg (Knight’s castle) 1828

Alte Nationalgalerie