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australia:stoves_gas

hiking gas stoves

introduction

  • a gas canister stove is a favorite choice for short, fast, and light backpacking trips for 1 or 2 people
    • they are lightweight, small, and easy to use
    • issues with gas canisters include:
      • once they are empty you can't do anything with them and have to carry them out with you, whereas liquid fuel bottles are reusable and refillable once emptied - although you still need to carry the empty bottles out, so this point is not really a great advantage
      • need to be weighed to determine how full they are
      • need to be holed then crushed to be recycled
  • for short trips to alpine or windy conditions, the MSR Windburner is a good choice for 1 or 2 people
  • for longer expeditions, liquid fuel stoves are usually preferred, especially for 2 or more people
    • the most versatile stoves are the MSR Whisperlite Universal and the MSR Dragonfly, both of which are multi-fuel capable, have good simmer control and are great for cooking for large groups, unlike the Dragonfly, the Universal also allows gas canister usage which then allows simmer control, and is also much less noisy.
      • they are meant to hold all kinds of cookware from large pots to skillets
      • liquid fuel stoves need to be primed before each use and this will take up to 90secs.
      • it does take a bit of know how and time to change out the different fuel adapters
      • more stable than basic stoves and come with a windscreen but are bulky to pack
      • the Whisperlite line of stoves are the easiest to take apart, troubleshoot, clean, repair, and put back together in the field (if you know how) and pack into a 2L pot

ultralight gas cartridge stoves

  • fuel requirements for those without a windscreen:
    • one person: 25g per day
    • two people: 40g per day
model price $US weight cup size size water boiled per 100g fuel features
MSR Pocket Rocket $40 85g nil compact, light, but no boil in wind at 10mph
Soto OD-1Rx WindMaster $ 67g nil ?>6L compact, light, piezo, simmer improves efficiency of boil, fast boil, some wind protection but no boil if >20mph and slow boil at 10mph1), still works well with very cold canisters, consider use with Optimus Terra Weekend HE .95L Pot or 900ML Evernew pot, optional large 4-flex pot stand for > 900mL pots
Snow Peak Giga $94 187g 600mL 100mm x 95mm 5L compact, light
Brunton Crux $119 255g 1300mL 159mm x 85mm 5L wide cook pot but bulky to pack
MSR Whisperlite Universal $140 326g nil 6L versatile, multi-fuel, windscreen, simmer (when used with gas)

heat exchanger gas cartridge stoves

  • the heat exchanger technology (eg. “flux ring”) burns fuel more efficiently especially in windy conditions (~1.3-1.8x more efficient) and provides a faster boil time (usually around 2 minutes for 2 cups water) BUT at a significant cost in weight and are less versatile when it comes to cooking
  • for shorter trips when cold, windy conditions are not likely, the increased fuel efficiency of the Jetboil Stove will not save enough fuel to make up for the additional weight and bulk of its components compared to basic stove and pot kits although it may be more convenient to setup.
  • MSR took the best of the MSR Reactor and Jetboil's designs and melded them into the MSR Windburner
  • The MSR Windburner and Reactor are much more wind resistant than either Jetboil model.
  • fuel requirements:
    • one person: 15g per day
    • two people: 25g per day
model price $US weight cup size size water boiled per 100g fuel features
JetBoil Zip $80 345g +27g stabilizer 0.8L 104 mm x 165 mm 10.5-12L basic model incl. neoprene insulated cooking cup; doesn't boil in wind
JetBoil Flash $100 400g +27g stabilizer 1L (can boil 500-800mL water) 104 mm x 180 mm 10.5-12L Piezo button ignition, boil indicator, doesn't boil in wind
MSR Windburner (WindBoiler) $130 432g 1L 108mm x 171mm better cozy and lid design than JetBoil, no Piezo, great in the wind
australia/stoves_gas.txt · Last modified: 2015/12/05 16:12 by gary1