A final Parisian art gallery post – can’t end the series without some works from the Louvre

Written by admin on August 6th, 2017

A brief exposé of some of the lesser known works in the Louvre art gallery.

These were all shot with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 II Micro Four Thirds camera with the Olympus mZD 40-150mm f/2.8 pro lens.

A touch of my own styling to some of the beautiful marble sculptures:

Louvre

Pierre Paul Rubens Portrait d’Helene Fourment 1636:

Louvre

Pierre Paul Rubens Clélie passant le Tibre (Cloelia crossing the Tiber) 1635:

Louvre

Antoon van Dyck Les Amours de Renaud et de l’enchanteresse Armide (The loves of Rinaldo and the enchantress Armida) 1641:

Louvre

Jacob Jordaens Le roi boit (The king drinks) 1638-40:

Louvre

My take on the Restoration of Melpomene Muse de la tragedie in marble 1st century AD Rome:

Louvre

Leonardo Da Vinci’s Saint Jean-Baptiste 1513-16 – sometimes reflections are impossible to get rid of, and I didn’t bring a polarising filter to help – my bad:

Louvre

Alessandro Filipepi dit Botticelli Un jeune homme presente par Venus 1483-85:

Louvre

Alessandro Filipepi dit Botticelli Venus et Le Trois Graces offrant des presents a une jeune fille (Venus and The Three Graces) 1483-85:

Louvre

My take on the Winged goddess of Victory of Samothrace 3rd-1st century BC Greece:

Louvre

Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy-Trioson Pygmalion et Galatee 1824:

Louvre

Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy-Trioson Atala au tombeau 1808:

Louvre

Louise David Les Sabines 1799:

Louvre

Louise David Les Amours de Paris et d’Helene 1788:

Louvre

Pierre Peyron La mort d’Alceste 1785:

Louvre

Anselm Kiefer Athanor 2007:

Louvre

Perhaps it is that we can’t appreciate life without seeing death, and perhaps we all too often take for granted the wonderful aspects of culture that history has betrothed upon us even though their permanence is not guaranteed in our violent world. Live in the presence and appreciate what we have, protect our past and look to a future enhanced by us being here – not a future of despair and destruction as has been the case so often in our past.

 

Comments Closed

Comments are closed.