Wilsons Prom – the beaches revisited

Written by Gary on October 21st, 2016

Once you have had your quick explore of the main areas of the Prom, you really need to go back and take your time to feel the places and use your photographic mindfulness to see what others don’t see – because there is much to see if you take your time and look and wait.
These were shot on Micro Four Thirds cameras such as the the Olympus OM-D E-M1 and follow on from my previous posts on Wilsons Prom:

Squeaky Beach in the morning sun:

Squeaky beach has to be one of my favorite remote beaches at low tide – the lovely white squeaky sand due to the rounded granules, the lovely clear stream you must cross with bare feet, the coloured plum pudding granite boulder maze at the north end while the south end has more massive rock formations with beautiful wild flowers in October – just don’t get too close to the edge – extra large rogue waves are common and will sweep you from the slippery granite into the ocean.
Squeaky Beach

How can you not like this stunning beach in the more gentle morning Spring sun before the school kids arrive?

Squeaky Beach

Down at the other end in the south, it has a different beauty as you watch in awe of the Bass Strait waves crashing on the rocks.

Squeaky Beach

It is so nice, the tourists are just happy doing selfie shots with the sea behind them – without regard for the beauties they have not discovered.

Squeaky Beach

The beach is not regarded as being a safe one for swimming but surfers don’t worry too much about strong under tows and the like.

Squeaky Beach

Young ladies taking in the sun watching the surf.

Squeaky Beach

Faces in the rocks and more wild flowers on the beach attracting native bees.

Whisky Bay:

Much less popular with the kids than is Squeaky Bay – makes it a nice spot to escape at low tide.

The are massive granite boulders at each end and a stream at the southern end.

Whisky Bay Beach

Whisky Bay Beach

Southern end as seen from the northern end boulders.

Whisky Bay Beach

A solitary surfer tackles the waves and boulders.

Darby Beach:

Darby Beach

Darby Beach is a 1.1km walk from the car park through some nice Spring wild flowers which are different to those at the other beaches.

Darby Beach

The beach is fairly desolate so a great place if you just want to walk to a quiet spot away from the crowds.

Darby Beach

 

The remote, desolate, Cotters Beach:

This is really only for the naturalists – there is unlikely to be anyone there on this rather expansive but non-descript beach but you do pass in the middle of Cotter’s lake to get there and with wetlands either side, I am sure the patient bird watcher will find what they want.

When I was there, at the start of the walk amongst the paperbarks were a group of blue superb fairy wrens flying around, while at the beach end it felt like Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds – lots of large black birds perched on the bushes.

The 1.2km 20min walk is a pleasant one along an exposed gravel road but with enough grass that one can comfortably do the 1km road part with barefeet but some foot wear is need for the last bit of gravel – just watch out for the sloppy emu droppings.

On either side is swampy wetlands.

Cotters Beach

The track to the beach through the swamp.

Cotters Beach

As I said, a fairly average beach – but it is remote and unlikely to have anyone else spending time there so if you like to be alone, this is the beach.

There are many other beaches, but access is via overnight camping hike trips.

If you are pushed for time, the must do areas are Tidal River, Mt Oberon Summit walk at sunset if possible, Squeaky beach and Whisky Bay (and don’t forget sunset at Big Drift if you have time on the way home). I would skip Darby and Cotters Beach unless you are looking for a more remote experience.

 

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